‘he liked to read, write, and whatch televishon’—The APU Writing and Reading Corpus (1979–1988)

AbstractRecent research has demonstrated the potential of corpus linguistics as a solid aid in children’s understanding of how language works. However, the availability of data from the UK is still somewhat limited. Most corpora are either based on a small number of schools, synchronic in nature, or focused on the post-National Curriculum era (cf. Lancaster Corpus of Children’s Project Writing, the Oxford Children’s Corpus, the Growth in Grammar Corpus); on the other hand, historical corpora are, unfortunately, not publicly available in electronic format (cf.

Quantitative Historical Linguistics: A Corpus Framework (Oxford Studies in Diachronic and Historical Linguistics). Gard B. Jenset and Barbara McGillivray

Quantitative Historical Linguistics: A Corpus Framework (Oxford Studies in Diachronic and Historical Linguistics). JensetGard B. and McGillivrayBarbara. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017. xiii +288 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-871817-8. $85.00 (hardback).

An improvement to Zeta

AbstractZeta has been described as ‘the most powerful general-purpose authorship tool currently available.’ It has been used to attribute parts of Arden of Faversham to Shakespeare and parts of 3 Henry VI to Marlowe, among other uses. The method was invented by John Burrows, but it is currently used in an adapted form developed by Hugh Craig. This article demonstrates that the method has not been adapted into its simplest form, thereby obscuring a true understanding of what it does.

Forensic stylometry

AbstractThe R Stylo program features, Rolling Delta and Rolling Classify, were applied to Thomas Kyd’s closet drama Cornelia. After the elimination of a large number of unsuitable reference texts, Marlowe’s Tamburlaine 1 turned out to be the play with the lowest delta values; that is it showed the smallest stylistic difference from Cornelia. In previous investigations the anonymous play The Tragedy of Locrine had been identified as a play by Christopher Marlowe (see Appendix).

The interpretation of Zeta test results

AbstractZeta has been described as the most powerful general-purpose authorship tool currently available. It is therefore of the utmost importance that Zeta test results be correctly interpreted, because incorrect interpretations can lead to incorrect authorship attributions. This article argues that the current method of interpreting Zeta results, pioneered by Craig and Kinney in Shakespeare, Computers, and the Mystery of Authorship and used in the Authorship Companion to The New Oxford Shakespeare, is unsound.

Authorship verification of disputed Hadiths in Sahih al-Bukhari and Muslim

AbstractSome argue that some religious books, Prophetic Traditions in particular, are adulterated, but this was sorted out by introducing a manual methodology for identifying authentic and non-authentic texts. The methodology is not precise and has become time-consuming and a daunting process today. A general motivation for many recent studies has been the desire to automate some descriptive processes and employ scientific observation in authorship identification/verification.

Katibeh: A Persian news summarizer using the novel semi-supervised approach

AbstractNowadays, text summarization is one of the most important active research fields in information retrieval. The most of the supervised extractive summarization systems utilize learning-to-rank methods to score sentences according to their importance. They need a high-quality comprehensive summarization corpus, which is labeled manually by human experts. Unfortunately, this sort of corpus is not available for most low-resource languages such as Persian.

Marlowe and overreaching: A misuse of stylometry

AbstractIn ‘Christopher Marlowe: Hype and Hoax’(2018), Hartmut Ilsemann implies that his application of the Rolling Delta feature of R Stylo is sufficiently robust that a century and a half of traditional scholarship should be overturned, and Marlowe stripped of the majority of his canon, including Doctor Faustus and Edward II. The article concludes that ‘Marlowe is totally overrated in his influence on modern English drama’ (p. 26), the natural consequence of stripping away 5/7ths of his canon.

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